Posts Tagged ‘dress’

Kl√§nning i rosa sidenaltlas. Nordiska museet inv.nr 183144.

April 7, 2012

OMG, have y’all seen this!?

I just stumbled upon this pink beauty on Tumblr. It’s from Nordiska museet!

It’s late 18th century, made in silk “atlas”? I have no idea what that is – anyone?

Imma go look through Nordiska Museets collections, because clearly it must have been updated! See ya!

Are you still there?

November 26, 2010

Hope you’re still reading! ūüėĄ Yes, this job stole a lot of sewing-time – but the truth is I already was extreeeeeemely bored with sewing on the trim! I have however noticed that I can steer my motivation for different projects. My motivation for this project was low for quite a while, but by starting to loook through my neglected blog feeds and watching The Duchess (again) – my motivation is growing! ;D
So, today I’m spending the day at home, being sick. I have christmas presents to make – but when they’re done I think I’ll take up the trimming again! ;D
And here’s a lol for ya:

Tease

May 5, 2010

Today I decided it was time to dress up once more and test and fit everything again, since I finished all the hemming. Well I didn’t need to fit it really, but I wanted to see that it still looked alright. I also wanted to take some better pics to show off my creation (this was the best I had). ;D So here you are, my pet-en-l’air so far:

Still only one arm trimmed though, and no real stomacher, hehe . And I kinda just wrapped the fabric for the petticoat round my waist… ^^;
I also used the one pocket hoop I have managed to make so far (soooo boring to seeew!) and they might work after all, what do y’all think?

Ooops, didn’t pin it very well, bah!

An inspirational walk

April 30, 2010

When I moved to √Ėrebro four¬†years ago, I had no intentions of making my own 18th century outfit – maybe having one made for me when I became a millionaire. So even if I was interested in 18th century clothing, I didn’t really pay much attention to the copies of 18th century women’s clothing at the open-air museum in Wadk√∂ping. Last summer I visited the museum again with my kid sister Jennie – I had totally forgotten about the clothes! But I was a little… horrified at what I saw. I had forgotten my camera that time though and never got to visit the museum again – until yesterday! Me and my friend Anja took a walk and ended up in Wadk√∂ping, as I had my camera with me I started snapping like crazy!
¬†¬† So now I want to share! The first outfit you see is actually a yellow silk pet-en-l’air with a black petticoat in tafetta.¬†(Click the images for HUGE versions.)

But I was extremely bugged out by the synthetic decorations… ^^; Sorry! I know I’m no expert and have no right to raise my voice, but… Baaah! But hey! It’s only a copy, I understand that it’s only supposed to be a representation of what was worn during the time.¬†^^ Cred to the woman who made the outfit, all¬†hand sewn, it IS very cute!¬†I’m not sure my own pet-en-l’air will look this accurate… =S
   The second outfit is more of a every day outfit. It has: a woolen jacket, a woolen petticoat, an apron and a fichu.

It reminds me a lot of the 18th century clothes¬†in¬†Nordiska museet’s database, with the wool and the stripes and the colors. This outfit and the clothes in the database also reminds a lot of Swedish folk dress. Here’s a photo of me in my folk dress, as a bonus… ;P
¬†¬† The last dress is… I don’t know what it is… But it kinda looks like a fantasy larp dress inspired by 18th century clothing. Which is nice too. The museum is dedicated to Caisa Warg, a very well-known Swedish woman who wrote the most famous Swedish cook cook of all time (Hjelpreda I hush√•llningen f√∂r unga Fruentimber – Help/assistant in the householdning for young women). She lived between 1703 and 1769 – so I guess this dress also is supposed to represent 18th century clothing. I like the stomacher and the colors! =)

The most interesting part of the museum though, I think, is the estate inventory of Caisa after her death:

I’m gonna try to translate the clothing part, bare with me (you Swedes out there who know more of the old Swedish clothing terms, please correct/help me!):

Black tafetta petticoat with rosy knee apron
Under petticoat
Brown gloves

Horsehair hat with red tafetta lining

Blue and white tafetta… something¬†(taftditon? anyone?) or jacket of blue damask

5 fans – ivory with black white paper
Hat with silver lace
Blue damask fur lined with greywork? (squirrel’s winter grey fur) backs
Yellow damask night/dressing robe

Scarf (maybe fichu) of fabric made from nettles or with flowers
Black velvet coat/cape
Black velvet calash(?) or long hood
Robe ronde of  silk with small dots
Jacket of black lampas
Lace engagenates

2 grieving hats
Blue half silk fur with greywork? (squirrel’s winter grey fur)¬†lining and ermine

This sure made me think of new projects! ;D

EDIT: I¬†hope I don’t sound like a know-it-all-bitch, I’m sorry in that case! ^^;

How cheap I really am!

September 9, 2009

In my last post I said quote:

‚Äď Wow, this has really become a quest for the cheapest way to make an as accurate as possible 18th century outfit, hehe ;P I‚Äôll have to try and¬†write down¬†exactly how little I actually have spent on this project! =D The shoes cost no more than 50 SEK btw ‚Äď about $5 I should think. ;D

And now I have summarized, to that extent my memory could manage, how much I have spent on stuff and materials for my very first “as-accurate-as-possible-for-as-little-monye-as-possible-18th-century-outfit”.
¬†¬† You can view the whole list at the page “What I’ve spent so far” to your right. But I’ll give you the whole so-far-total right here and now, and I am serious!:

273 SEK ‚Čą 27 EUR ‚Čą 39 USD ‚Čą 23,50 GBP

Museum date euphoria!

August 12, 2009

We (read: I) decided that it was time to lift our soft and cosy bottoms from the computer chairs and visit the county museum – after three years living here I still hadn’t been.
¬†¬† √Ėrebro County Museum (√Ėrebro L√§ns Museum) isn’t very big at all, but I felt it MUST be worth a visit – every museum, in my mind, is! It was allright, but we seemed to have saved the best for last.
¬†¬† They have a room called “Klenodkammaren” – The Treasue Chamber (roughly), there they keep mostly jewellry, coins and silver cups. But when I first looked through the doorway my eyes met a green silk dress… I rushed past the display cases of viking jewellry and old coins and pressed my face against the glass. “Late 18th century” I said with a dry voice and blinked a few times… I inspected the fabric, the pink flower pattern, the cut, and sighed. It was an original allright, but it hung all wrong – it was a simple two pieced outfit with a fully closed jacket and a petticoat, the petticoat hung straight down from where the jacket ended and was made to stand out at the bottom – not even a hint of hips!
¬†¬† I didn’t let it bother me very long though – because in the corner of my eye I¬†saw a pair of shoes. They had the common 18th century look with a flower pattern in¬†mostly greens and pinks – not the same fabric as the dress, but they kinda matched. When I found out the size was a 36 I had a brief weak moment and¬†thought of¬†ways to make them mine – most ways were illegal. ;P
¬†¬† When I felt I had seen all details I wanted to see, and could see¬†without breaking the glass I sighed again;¬†a signal for Robbie who called my name: “How about some 18th century garters?” I rushed through the room again and pressed my face against another glass. They had three beautifully embroidered garters, and what¬†a petite flower embroidery it was! They were beautiful! Nowhere on the net have I seen such beautiful gartes! I wish I could do such petite embroidery – if I could I wouldn’t hesitate to make copies of exactly those garters!
¬†¬† I let my wide eyes fall from the garters and down on two as beautifully embroidered pocket books – extremely small stitches made up vines of small oh so small flowers… Long, long I admired them – and sighed over my now seemingly extremely clumsy hands.
   Sadly there were no cameras allowed Рand I respected that. This is the only photo from Klenodkammaren I could find:

Knoppar

Report

July 30, 2009

Today I’ve finished and fitted the mock-up for the pet-en-l’air! And if¬†I didn’t say so earlier, I’m using the pattern for a Robe¬†√† la Francaise¬†¬†La Couturi√®re Parisienne provides on their site –¬†the measurements¬†fits me perfectly, how lucky is that!?

contouche_e bodice back

Actually I basicly could start cutting the actual pieces right now – but my back and knees are hurting like hell from kneeling on the floor half the day… ūüėĄ Some one please buy me a mansion with an atelier and a cutting table!!!

Tailor

Pet-en-l’air

December 7, 2008

So, a very friendly girl with similar interests in 18th century clothing as me; Johanna (her blog), commented on my last blog entry and notified me that the “caraco”-type dress I was going for was called pet-en-l‚Äôair.
   That I can tell you was some very helpful information Рso thank you again Johanna! =D

Thoughts about the dress/jacket

December 7, 2008

So, the petticoat will be made out of the goldish fabric and making a skirt is simple enough. But the design and pattern of the “robe” is something I really hade to think hard and long about. I only have that bit of fabric, I bought it second hand and I don’t know if I can find more with the exact pattern and colors. =/
¬†¬† I think I’ll have to make a caraco jacket, which kinda (after my research)¬†is like an ordinary robe¬†√† la fran√ßaise or¬†anglaise but shorter. If I start with the top (the bodice part) I can just make the skirt part as long as the fabric allows. I would very much like to have the trail draping (watteau folds?) of a robe a la francaise, but I don’t know if the amount of fabric would allow that. =/

This closely resembles what I had in mind:

Caraco

Most vintage caraco jackets I’ve found pictures of¬†around the net go together fully in the front, without stomacher But it looks like this one has a stomacher. It also has that draping (watteau folds?) in the back! So I think I can justify my combining the stomacher with a caraco jacket as pretty time-typical by refering to this image, hehe ^^;
¬†¬† This looks to be of the time of the later half of the century where women started to cover up their bosoms, sleeves grew longer, the hip width shrinked and the bum grew. So I’m faced with a dilemma; I want the deep d√©colletage and the wide hips¬†with the pocket hoops! =/
¬†¬† Oh well, I’ll do a litte more detailed research, hehe. <D


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