Posts Tagged ‘Book’

Traces of textiles in Swedish supplementary law 1644-1794

June 18, 2010

A fellow larp:er and costumer, Adam Norman, has just finished a paper on textiles in Swedish supplementary law between 1644 and 1794. I am sooo excited to start reading it!

Unfortunatley it’s in Swedish, but this is the abstract:

The purpose for this paper has been to study the clothing as it appears in Swedish supplementary law between the years 1644-1794. The author have been studying the original documents and comparing laws from different years with each other. Old names of textiles have been explained, as far as have been possible. Through the study we can see how the laws first regulated the nobility, but quite quickly spread to burgess, the priesthood as well as the common people. There are some great differences in what the different classes were allowed to wear. The supplementary law both deals with the fabrics , the decorations and the cut and construction of clothing. In the laws we can see that the Swedish state introduced exact models of how the people should dress in the mid-18th century. The laws shows us what the government wished for, and not the absolute reality. In order to see how the laws were followed we must examine court orders and perhaps even art.

As soon as I’ve read it I’ll try to write a little summary, or something like it! ;D

For you Swedes, you can download the paper from Adams blog, here.

Adam in his 17th century garb

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An inspirational walk

April 30, 2010

When I moved to Örebro four years ago, I had no intentions of making my own 18th century outfit – maybe having one made for me when I became a millionaire. So even if I was interested in 18th century clothing, I didn’t really pay much attention to the copies of 18th century women’s clothing at the open-air museum in Wadköping. Last summer I visited the museum again with my kid sister Jennie – I had totally forgotten about the clothes! But I was a little… horrified at what I saw. I had forgotten my camera that time though and never got to visit the museum again – until yesterday! Me and my friend Anja took a walk and ended up in Wadköping, as I had my camera with me I started snapping like crazy!
   So now I want to share! The first outfit you see is actually a yellow silk pet-en-l’air with a black petticoat in tafetta. (Click the images for HUGE versions.)

But I was extremely bugged out by the synthetic decorations… ^^; Sorry! I know I’m no expert and have no right to raise my voice, but… Baaah! But hey! It’s only a copy, I understand that it’s only supposed to be a representation of what was worn during the time. ^^ Cred to the woman who made the outfit, all hand sewn, it IS very cute! I’m not sure my own pet-en-l’air will look this accurate… =S
   The second outfit is more of a every day outfit. It has: a woolen jacket, a woolen petticoat, an apron and a fichu.

It reminds me a lot of the 18th century clothes in Nordiska museet’s database, with the wool and the stripes and the colors. This outfit and the clothes in the database also reminds a lot of Swedish folk dress. Here’s a photo of me in my folk dress, as a bonus… ;P
   The last dress is… I don’t know what it is… But it kinda looks like a fantasy larp dress inspired by 18th century clothing. Which is nice too. The museum is dedicated to Caisa Warg, a very well-known Swedish woman who wrote the most famous Swedish cook cook of all time (Hjelpreda I hushållningen för unga Fruentimber – Help/assistant in the householdning for young women). She lived between 1703 and 1769 – so I guess this dress also is supposed to represent 18th century clothing. I like the stomacher and the colors! =)

The most interesting part of the museum though, I think, is the estate inventory of Caisa after her death:

I’m gonna try to translate the clothing part, bare with me (you Swedes out there who know more of the old Swedish clothing terms, please correct/help me!):

Black tafetta petticoat with rosy knee apron
Under petticoat
Brown gloves

Horsehair hat with red tafetta lining

Blue and white tafetta… something (taftditon? anyone?) or jacket of blue damask

5 fans – ivory with black white paper
Hat with silver lace
Blue damask fur lined with greywork? (squirrel’s winter grey fur) backs
Yellow damask night/dressing robe

Scarf (maybe fichu) of fabric made from nettles or with flowers
Black velvet coat/cape
Black velvet calash(?) or long hood
Robe ronde of  silk with small dots
Jacket of black lampas
Lace engagenates

2 grieving hats
Blue half silk fur with greywork? (squirrel’s winter grey fur) lining and ermine

This sure made me think of new projects! ;D

EDIT: I hope I don’t sound like a know-it-all-bitch, I’m sorry in that case! ^^;

Crochet craze!

January 18, 2010

I haven’t done chrochet since 4th grade, I made a pouch in black, purple, yellow and pink and since then I haven’t done any crochet at all! This christmas my sister Jennie gave me this book “Virka Amigurumi” (Crochet Amigurumi).

At first I had my doubts, would I be able to learn this fine complicated art again? But since I’m a total japanophile I had to give it a try… Turns out it actually isn’t very complicated at all and now I’m hooked! I’m not just making cute little japanese plushies – I’m making cupcakes and wrist warmers with all kinds of decorations. Now I see myself making simple lace, caps, shawls and fichus in the future!
   Today I went through Jane of all trades… to see what I had missed during my dark ages of ignorance. Remember that reference book Encyclopedia of Needlework, by Thérèse Dillmont? The online version…? (Which now contains tutorial videos on YouTube, btw…) Well Clare of  Jane of All Trades… found an online version of a book of the same character, namely Beeton’s Book of Needlework, by Isabella Beeton. And as far as I can see it’s even better than the Encyclopedia of Needlework!

I have tried to see what crochet work was made during the 18th century, I had a hard time finding anything and then I found this:

Both crochet and tatting are 19th century techniques. There are a few books around that talk about crochet and tatting dating back to the 15th century or earlier, but so far, those who have looked for or looked at the textiles in question either find that they’re nonexistent or are mislabled needle lace or knotting (which are not the same as tatting), or nalbinding (which can look a little like crochet but is really not the same thing). (http://www.marariley.net/knitting/knitting.htm)

Darn it… Oh well – I might cheat on that matter… ;P

“Le Corset”

October 16, 2009

This degree thesis thing I’m working on has kept me awake at night for a week now, it’s the only thing I think about – almost… I think it’s a waste of time to eat, sleep and go to the toilet (I can’t even begin to describe how stressed out I am), but still I find time to think about 18th century fashion! XD
   By chance I came by this wiki-page full of interesting high resolution pictures from a book: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Le_Corset_(1905). The book is from 1905, it’s called Le Corset and is written by a Dr. Ludovic O’Followell – you can view the whole book here.

Stays


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