Archive for the ‘Fabric’ Category

Medieval materials for the 18th century reenactor?

November 29, 2010

I was just cleaning up my favourites and I found this Swedish shop selling stuff for the medieval reenactor – Medeltidsmode. I had a look through the shop to see if I should save the link. I am interested in medieval reenacting, but right not I have only the 18th century on my mind – so my radar is set on that period. When looking through the goods I found myself thinking: “Ooh, that fabric would do nicely for shifts” a.s.o.
   They also have these old-fashioned pins, said to be perfect for fine fabrics:

So go have a look through the shop! Or go have a look in other medieval or maybe renaissance reenacting shops. Everything wasn’t new and novel in the 18th century – still today we use techniques and materials with roots waaaaay back in the history of fashion. ;D

Starting a new piece

July 25, 2010

So, now I’ve got a serious case of pms-mood… I feel like sewing, but I’m sooo tired of pinning the trim, or emroidering buttons… Gotta start something new!
   I started looking trough my stuff and said to myself – why not start with the petticoat!? I’m gonna use this method, kindy described by Katherine (Thank you!).

I’m thinking I shouldn’t start with the one I’m actually gonna use for the pet-en-l’air. So I’m starting with a fabric I’m not too careful of, but still can use as an under petticoat or simple womans petticoat – like the old light green linen sheet I used for the lining of the pet-en-l’air. There’s still enough for a petticoat see. ;D
   Shouldn’t be too hard, right? ;P
   Totally making this one by machine btw! It’s just a kind of toille that I might wear later anyway so… ;P

Traces of textiles in Swedish supplementary law 1644-1794

June 18, 2010

A fellow larp:er and costumer, Adam Norman, has just finished a paper on textiles in Swedish supplementary law between 1644 and 1794. I am sooo excited to start reading it!

Unfortunatley it’s in Swedish, but this is the abstract:

The purpose for this paper has been to study the clothing as it appears in Swedish supplementary law between the years 1644-1794. The author have been studying the original documents and comparing laws from different years with each other. Old names of textiles have been explained, as far as have been possible. Through the study we can see how the laws first regulated the nobility, but quite quickly spread to burgess, the priesthood as well as the common people. There are some great differences in what the different classes were allowed to wear. The supplementary law both deals with the fabrics , the decorations and the cut and construction of clothing. In the laws we can see that the Swedish state introduced exact models of how the people should dress in the mid-18th century. The laws shows us what the government wished for, and not the absolute reality. In order to see how the laws were followed we must examine court orders and perhaps even art.

As soon as I’ve read it I’ll try to write a little summary, or something like it! ;D

For you Swedes, you can download the paper from Adams blog, here.

Adam in his 17th century garb

One arm trimmed

April 27, 2010

Indeed I finished the hemming that last time, and I even managed to trim one arm!
Whaddaya think? =D

And here’s some inspiration: My cousins “in-law” are renovating a house and found this wonderful wallpaper under a few layers of newer wallpaper. It’s probably a 50’s-60’s wallpaper, but it clearly has 18th century inspiration. They also found these huge hand made nails. I arranged it a little and took a still life photo:

Hem

April 16, 2010

Just a quick post to show you the hem, proof that my hands are working by themselves… ;P

And yeah, this is the front “corner”, I rounded it cuz I liked the look:

Silk & the 18th century in Swedish radio

March 24, 2010

It just struck me that I forgot to post the promised photos of that yellow silk I’m aiming to use for a pair of mitts. So here they come! ;D

This is the box I found it in, it says “Yellow silk for table cloth” in my grandmother’s writing. I’m guessing it’s left-overs from the making of the table cloth, saved in case the table cloth would be damaged.

And the silk:

And for my fellow Swedish-speaking 18th century-philes… This morning my favourite morning radio show, Morgonpasset i P3, had a guest – Sara Lodin. She’s an 18th century freak and anwsered questions about the 18th century in the show this morning. Listen to the show here. And here’s a pic of Sara in full gear in the studio (from the site):

Well, now I’m off for sewing! ;D

Mitts

January 21, 2010

I have this old piece of yellow silk (yes yes, pics coming! ;P) that I’ve kinda inherited. I’ve been a little scared of using it if I’d mess up. But I figured I’d have to get over it and soon I was thinking of what I might be able to do with such a small piece (or rather pieces, haven’t measured them yet either). Soon it came to me – mitts! And as far as I know silk actually was used for mitts – the MET has a few examples…
   I was thinking something in the line of these:

18th century mitts, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

So a few days ago I inquired after a free simple pattern on the Historical Sewing Forum, the results weren’t as great as I had wished, so I started thinking of making an own pattern.
   However, today I came upon a more modern pattern, all by chance! Have a glance at these:

By yoshimi @ BurdaStyle. Now I know that these propably are made for stretchy fabrics and son’t have the right cut aso. aso. aso. But It’s hell of a good start! ;D Go check out BurdaStyle! You have to be a member to get free patterns and stuff, but signing up is free too so it’s totally worth it! ^^

What’s been going on…

December 2, 2009

Since the last post I’ve been busy busy busy with school. But I’ve made some progress – sporadicly. =) Sleeves are now longer, I have meters and meters of trimming, and both sides of the pet-en-l’air is gathered! I have also been working on the chemise/shift… Well, just have a look at the pics! =)

A hip:

One shoulder of the shift:

A heap of trimming:

New inspiration!

October 9, 2009

Have you noticed how good the MET are at putting up new pieces in the costume institute’s online collections? I totally adore them – they should get a price or something!!! ❤
   At breakfast today I had a cup of tea and a new look at the MET’s online collections – and to my total exultation I found a new pet-en-l’air to inspire my work. It’s labeled “Jacket (Caraco)” but don’t you think it should say pet-en-l’air? S=/

New pet-en-l'air

Notice the super cute printed cotton! Have to have!
   I’m also noticing the lack of trim at the bottom… I was considering leaving that out on my own pet-en-l’air, but I thought it might not look very good – this kinda confirms my thoughts; it’s the only thing on this piece that I don’t like all that much. I’m trimming the bottom of my pet-en-l’air!

Oh, and about that lecture I went to: It was fun – but you didn’t miss much. One hour was a short lecture considering they went through 300 years of wedding and coronation fashion history. All the costumes they showed pictures of will be exhibited at Livrustkammaren in Stockholm in May 2010 – so look fowared to that instead! =)

Progress – on everything but the pet-en-l’air

September 18, 2009

Instead of using my inspiration for the pet-en-l’air the last time, I started with the chemise/shift. I’m doubting the fabric actually is linen though… =/ It totally looked and felt like the linen I used for the lining of the pet-en-l’air when I bought it, now it kinda doesn’t, I think it’s 100% cotton… Hmmm… =/
   I also started the hat making process the day before yesterday, yesterday I finished it! With a lot of ugly swearing and PMS-tears (PMS really sneaks up on ya, doesn’t it!?) it came out better than I could have imagined actually.

HAT!

The finished product! It’s totally the look I wanted, it’s a bit uneven, but after a little decoration I’m sure no one will notice! ^^;

Lingon

And just for fun – crown on an old lingonberry jam bucket… XD


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