An inspirational walk

When I moved to Örebro four years ago, I had no intentions of making my own 18th century outfit – maybe having one made for me when I became a millionaire. So even if I was interested in 18th century clothing, I didn’t really pay much attention to the copies of 18th century women’s clothing at the open-air museum in Wadköping. Last summer I visited the museum again with my kid sister Jennie – I had totally forgotten about the clothes! But I was a little… horrified at what I saw. I had forgotten my camera that time though and never got to visit the museum again – until yesterday! Me and my friend Anja took a walk and ended up in Wadköping, as I had my camera with me I started snapping like crazy!
   So now I want to share! The first outfit you see is actually a yellow silk pet-en-l’air with a black petticoat in tafetta. (Click the images for HUGE versions.)

But I was extremely bugged out by the synthetic decorations… ^^; Sorry! I know I’m no expert and have no right to raise my voice, but… Baaah! But hey! It’s only a copy, I understand that it’s only supposed to be a representation of what was worn during the time. ^^ Cred to the woman who made the outfit, all hand sewn, it IS very cute! I’m not sure my own pet-en-l’air will look this accurate… =S
   The second outfit is more of a every day outfit. It has: a woolen jacket, a woolen petticoat, an apron and a fichu.

It reminds me a lot of the 18th century clothes in Nordiska museet’s database, with the wool and the stripes and the colors. This outfit and the clothes in the database also reminds a lot of Swedish folk dress. Here’s a photo of me in my folk dress, as a bonus… ;P
   The last dress is… I don’t know what it is… But it kinda looks like a fantasy larp dress inspired by 18th century clothing. Which is nice too. The museum is dedicated to Caisa Warg, a very well-known Swedish woman who wrote the most famous Swedish cook cook of all time (Hjelpreda I hushållningen för unga Fruentimber – Help/assistant in the householdning for young women). She lived between 1703 and 1769 – so I guess this dress also is supposed to represent 18th century clothing. I like the stomacher and the colors! =)

The most interesting part of the museum though, I think, is the estate inventory of Caisa after her death:

I’m gonna try to translate the clothing part, bare with me (you Swedes out there who know more of the old Swedish clothing terms, please correct/help me!):

Black tafetta petticoat with rosy knee apron
Under petticoat
Brown gloves

Horsehair hat with red tafetta lining

Blue and white tafetta… something (taftditon? anyone?) or jacket of blue damask

5 fans – ivory with black white paper
Hat with silver lace
Blue damask fur lined with greywork? (squirrel’s winter grey fur) backs
Yellow damask night/dressing robe

Scarf (maybe fichu) of fabric made from nettles or with flowers
Black velvet coat/cape
Black velvet calash(?) or long hood
Robe ronde of  silk with small dots
Jacket of black lampas
Lace engagenates

2 grieving hats
Blue half silk fur with greywork? (squirrel’s winter grey fur) lining and ermine

This sure made me think of new projects! ;D

EDIT: I hope I don’t sound like a know-it-all-bitch, I’m sorry in that case! ^^;

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3 Responses to “An inspirational walk”

  1. Rowenna Says:

    I love inventories for finding fun clothing factoids! A friend of mine has a book with dozens of inventories from New France, and they’re astounding–purple stockings! Dozens of multicolored silk and printed cotton kercheifs! Really fun…and that’s not even getting into the pilk silk taffetta ensemble that belonged to a woman waaayy out in the middle of nowhere territory…with matching pink slippers.

    Sometimes I get cranky at museum choices with how they dress the manequins, too…my husband hates taking me places 🙂

    • Maria Says:

      Haha, I kinda hate myself for pointing things like this out, I hate know-it-alls! But I kinda love doing it! ;P
      That book sounds very interesting! =D

  2. Clare Sager Says:

    Nah, you don’t sound like a know-it-all at all, so don’t worry! 🙂

    Thank you for translating that list – I find that kind of thing really interesting. Glad to hear she had 5 fans – if my boyf tries to complain about the few I have, I’ll point out to him that any 18th century lady worth her salt would have 5 … at least!

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